Addiction to Pain Pills: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Addiction to Pain Pills: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Addiction to Pain Pills, Signs Someone Is Addicted To Pills, Addiction to Pain Pills

While many believe that painkillers are safe, especially if they are available over-the-counter (OTC), truth is, there is a fine line between using them for a legitimate reason, and abusing them for their effects and the way they make you feel. Addiction to pain pills is real and can be lethal. Addiction is a disease that can affect anyone.

Pain pills, pain relievers, or painkillers are medicines aimed to reduce or relieve aches and pains. These are available both as OTC and under prescription opioids. However, because of their analgesic nature, they are often abused.

Addiction to pain pills is primarily caused because of the short-lived euphoria painkillers provide, but people also abused them because:

  • It makes the feel more relaxed
  • To be or feel more alert
  • To experiment the mental effects of the substance
  • To improve concentration
  • To experience the high

Unfortunately, an addiction to pain pills can only have negative consequences. There are many health conditions that are related to painkiller addiction and - if left untreated - could develop into life-threatening situations.

Some of the side effects of an addiction to pain pills that could lead to health complications are:

  • Low blood pressure
  • Slowed and shallow breathing
  • Memory problems
  • High body temperature
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart rhythm irregularity
  • Seizures
  • Tremors
  • Hallucinations and paranoia
  • Aggressiveness

Clear signs someone is addicted to pills are not hard to identify. The important thing is getting help from the very first moment they appear. If you - or someone you love - is struggling with an addiction to painkillers, the signs you should be looking out for are:

  • Agitation and confusion
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Anxiety episodes
  • Panic attacks
  • High body temperature
  • Isolation
  • Decreased appetite
  • Restlessness
  • Taking higher doses than prescribed
  • Appearing to be high, unusually energetic or hyper
  • Excessive mood swings

These signs someone is addicted to pills are just a few of the most common ones. But, knowing that there are other health factors that are not necessarily so easy to identify, makes an addiction to pain pills all the more dangerous.

When you first recognize signs someone is addicted to pills, you should seek help and support immediately. Because this is something that can lead to fatal consequences, it is important to receive medical guidance and support.

A good rehabilitation process is necessary to overcome this type of addiction. The development of this type of addiction is a psychological disorder that needs intensive treatment to be tackled.

To be able to start getting clean and recover, you will most likely need medical detox to be able to get clean and prepared for rehabilitation. Detox will be followed be inpatient/outpatient drug rehab, where personalized therapeutic treatments will be implemented to cover all of your individual needs.

In addition to addiction rehab, you will learn new coping skills and mechanisms to prevent relapse, will adopt healthier habits to fight off old triggers and will receive guidance and support in developing your aftercare plan.

The continuous care plan is the final stage of treatment, and it outlines the support system you will use to maintain sobriety in the long term, after you have completed treatment and left our facility.

If you believe you recognize signs someone is addicted to pills, or are in fear that you may have an abuse problem, we can help you can find the right facility and treatment program that best suits your needs. Call now at (305) 260-6513 and speak to on of our Representatives to learn more.

 

 

Sources:

https://medlineplus.gov/painrelievers.html

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/prescription-over-counter-medications

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/misuse-prescription-drugs/summary

 

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